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Wilton House from the South East (Wilton House, South East View across the River Nadder)
National Galleries of Scotland, Edinburgh, on loan from the Mrs M Sharpe Erskine Trust
School of Wilson
Wilton House from the South East (Wilton House, South East View across the River Nadder)
Undated
Oil on canvas
54.5 x 90 cm
21 1/2 x 35 7/16 in.
NWP76D
On a warm summer evening Wilton House and the Palladian Bridge are seen in the middle distance across the River Nadder. By the river bank in the foreground is a group of three figures, one of whom is drawing.
Mrs Magdalene Sharpe Erskine (died 1 February 1872); the Trustees of Mrs M Sharpe Erskine
Wilton House, standing at the junction of the rivers Nadder and Wiley, was designed to the commission of the 4th Earl of Pembroke by John Webb, son-in-law of Inigo Jones. It was severely damaged by fire in 1647 or 1648 and the great Palladian south front, designed by Isaac de Caus (perhaps with some assistance from Jones), was rebuilt. The house was completed by 1656. The Palladian Bridge, visible at the water's extremity, was built in 1737 by Henry the 9th Earl with the help of Roger Morris. In the 18th century the house was one of the most popular on the tour circuit because of its romantic picturesque setting and its great art collection. Two of the major attractions were the richly decorated 'Single Cube' and 'Double Cube' rooms, the latter hung with portraits by Van Dyck. In 1758, 2,324 people came to see the house and only Stowe and Blenheim could boast more visitors. Wilton provided inspiration for at least three Georgian houses - Houghton, Hagley and Croome.
D352 Wilton House from the South East, Leeds Museums and Galleries
W. Watts, Seats of the Nobility and Gentry, published 20 May 1786, pl. LXXXII
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The painting does not appear in WGC and stylistically does not seem more than a studio work at best to the present compiler.
S. Lloyd, Catalogue of Paintings and Sculpture at Duff House, 1999, p. 12 cat. 12
Wilton House, Wiltshire, England
The clock tower at the right of the building no longer exists in that form.